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Clarinet student places first in concerto competition

Tuesday, February 8, 2011

LAWRENCE — Eric C. Umble, a sophomore majoring in clarinet performance at the University of Kansas, placed first at the 39th annual Arapahoe Philharmonic Concerto Competition for Woodwinds, Brass and Percussion.

The competition took place Jan. 15 in Littleton, Colo. For his performance of Mozart’s “Clarinet Concerto,” Umble received a cash prize and the opportunity to perform with the Littleton Philharmonic on March 11.

Umble has appeared with the International Youth Wind Ensemble at the World Association for Symphonic Bands and Ensemble Conference and the Rocky Ridge Festival Orchestra. He has performed as principal clarinet with the KU Symphony Orchestra and the KU Wind Ensemble. He also has performed with the Helianthus Contemporary Ensemble. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Lancaster Red Rose Award for Community Service, and was one of four winners of the KU Concerto Competition last year. Umble plans to travel to the Netherlands in March to present a collaborative recital to benefit the Dutch Council for Refugees.

Umble, who studies with professor Stephanie Zelnick at KU, is the son of Ron and Diane Umble of Lancaster, Pa. He is a graduate of Lancaster Mennonite School.

The Arapahoe Philharmonic Competition is managed through the Arapahoe Philharmonic Orchestra in Littleton, Colo. It is open to college students in Colorado and surrounding states. The first round of the competition was a taped submission, and nine finalists were asked to give a live audition in Colorado for the final round.

 



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