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KU School of Music announces student concerto competition winners

Monday, October 25, 2010

On Saturday, October 9, 2010, a jury selected four students as winners of the KU Symphony Orchestra Student Concerto Competition. This event took place at the Lied Center of Kansas.

The winners are:

  • Gregory Battista-performing Vladimir Cosma's Concerto for Euphonium and Orchestra, third movement. Battista studies under Professor Scott Watson.
  • GaEun Kim-performing Tchaikovsky's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, first movement. Kim studies under Professor Tami Lee Hughes.
  • Chrystal Lam-performing Concerto No. 2 for Piano and Orchestra, third movement, by Camille Saint-Saens. Lam studies under Professor Jack Winerock.
  • Eric Umble-performing Mozart's Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, first movement. Umble studies under Professor Stephanie Zelnick.

The alternate selected was Janis Porietis-performing Alexander Arutiunian's Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra. Porietis studies under Professor Steve Leisring.

The winners will be featured in the February 17 2011 KU Symphony Orchestra concert at the Lied Center. Also featured during the concert will be the composition Front Range, composed by Dan Musselman. Musselman won the 2010 KU George Lawner prize for this work. The guest conductor on February 17 will be Akira Mori, Director of Orchestras at Drake University in Des Moines.

For more information about this concert, contact the KU School of Music at 785-864-3436. www.music.ku.edu

 



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