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KU Tuba-Euphonium Consort returns from performance at prestigious conference

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

The KU Tuba-Euphonium Consort, under the direction of Professor Scott C. Watson, recently returned from a performance at the International Tuba Euphonium Conference held at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

The consort performed Mozart's Divertimento No. 1 arranged by retired KU bassoon professor Alan Hawkins. They then performed with top students from the studios from the Conservatory of Music at UMKC and the Department of Music at Missouri Western State University in the ensemble the Thunder All Star Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble. This ensemble was under the direction of Professor Watson and Professor Thomas Stein of UMKC, as well as Professor Lee Harrelson of Missouri Western and guest conductor Helen Tyler of St. James Academy.

KU students performing with the KU Tuba Euphonium Consort and the Thunder All Star Ensemble were: Ben McMillan (MM) Cookeville, TN; Bo Atlas (Tuba Performance) San Jose, CA.; Charles Page (DMA) West Monroe, LA. Kirsten Hoogstraten (Music Education) Kansas City, MO.; Rafael Morales (MM) Puerto Rico; Eddie Miles (Music Education) Olathe, KS.

This performance was made possible by underwriting and support from both the Zakoura Family Foundation and Reach Out Kansas Inc.

For more information, contact the KU School of Music at 785-864-3436. www.music.ku.edu

 



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Music students present hundreds of public concerts every year
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